Nov, 2018

The Word and the Defense of Our Catholic Faith

Bro. Duane Cartujano
An Abstract
We, Catholics, encounter people from other religions, sects and denominations who constantly dispute anything about Catholicism e.g. the Eucharist, the role of Mary in the Church, the Crucifix, the honor we give to Saints, and even the Bible we use. We are put into apologetic situations where we are required to provide answers and engage in a friendly “conversation” with non-Catholics. In such situations, it is imperative for us to have the proper information and to know the available resources where we can find the answers to those challenging and provoking questions.
The topic is divided into seven questions explaining why knowledge of the scripture is essential in the understanding of our faith: (1) Can we trust the Bible?, (2) Is it true there is no Bible without the Catholic Church?, (3) Did the Catholic Church invent the Deuterocanonical Books?, (4) Are those who use the Bible making the right statements?, (5) Is the New Testament corrupted?, (6) Are all Bible versions reliable?, and (7) Why don’t Catholics believe in “Sola Scriptura” or “Scripture Alone”? These questions aim to facilitate better and deeper understanding of our faith if we know and read the Word of God.

Bro. Duane Cartujano
      He is a Professor at St. Pius X Seminary. Bro. Duane studied Biblical Language at the Israel Institute of Biblical Studies. His knowledge of Biblical Language was enhanced through the assistance of Dr. Eugene Ulrich, a Professor Emeritus at University of Notre Dame.
      He was recommended by Dr. Daniel Wallace, Senior Professor of Dallas Theological Seminary as Defender of Jesus Christ as God. Brother Duane is often invited as speaker to talk about Apologetics. He is currently a mentor of the Apologetics and Research Ministry of the Roman Catholic Church with members in Iloilo, Aklan, Antique, and Capiz. He is also a mentor of vibes ministry composed of young apologists who continuously study how to defend the Catholic Church.